Systemic Supervision is an experiential approach that explores the self of the therapist and reciprocal influences between two systems: therapist and client. Often times a therapist, during her work with a client, will become immobilized, feel frustrated, alone, and set drift without a compass. This can be the result of hidden loyalties in the therapist’s family system, past trauma or fear being activated by the client’s issues. This is usually where the therapist will identify herself as “stuck.”

Drawn from the Family Constellation work of Bert Hellinger, Family Therapy (Minuchin & Haley) and Gestalt Therapy, Systemic Supervision invokes inquiry that compels the therapist toward a deep introspection.  Through the use of ritual and experiential exercises, the therapist/supervisee will to learn to move with resistance, discover resources, reconnect to her creativity, and to remain open and present to the therapeutic process.

Who is Systemic Supervision For?
Coaches, clinical supervisors, facilitators, healers, teachers, and therapists from a broad range of backgrounds, would benefit from this approach. It is designed to support one’s strength yet at the same invoke a deeper understanding of one’s place in the therapeutic process.


  • When to seek supervision
  • How to identify systemic/therapeutic entanglements
  • How to identify family of origin/cultural issues that may help or hinder your work
  • How to separate your issues from the client’s
  • How to remain present in the face of uncertainty
  • How to identify and use resources